Hawaii Asks Federal Court For Clarification As Travel Ban Goes Into Effect

  • Hawaii Asks Federal Court For Clarification As Travel Ban Goes Into Effect

Hawaii Asks Federal Court For Clarification As Travel Ban Goes Into Effect

People from six mainly Muslim countries and all refugees now face tougher U.S. entry due to President Donald Trump's controversial travel ban.

Travelers from six Muslim-majority countries with links to terrorism have to meet certain requirements before they can enter the U.S. The countries affected include Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.

"(The) American public could have legitimate concerns about their safety when we open our doors", said Heather Nauert, a State Department spokesperson.

Scattered protests broke out in New York's Union Square and Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) on Thursday, but they were far smaller in scale compared to the ones in January, when thousands swarmed airports around the country in reaction to Trump's rollout of the travel ban. "They even have a right to a lawyer and she hasn't had a lawyer".

Her father, two sisters and other relatives left war-torn Yemen but are stuck in Jordan.

"I've been very mentally and emotionally drained from all this for a while", she said.

A "bona fide relationship", according to the Supreme Court's ruling, includes a "parent, spouse, fiancée, child, adult son or daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law or sibling in the USA", but does not include any further family extension as warranting a pass to the United States.

On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court let the Trump travel ban to go into effect for 90 days, but it allowed people with "close familial relationships" with someone in the United States to enter. The guidelines sent to US embassies and consulates on Wednesday said applicants from the six countries must prove a relationship with a parent, spouse, child, adult son or daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law or sibling in the U.S.

Earlier this year, the roll-out of the initial travel ban caused chaos and confusion through United States airports, American law enforcement agencies and foreign countries.

Moments before the ban began at 20:00 Washington time on Thursday (00:00 GMT), it emerged that the state of Hawaii had asked a federal judge for clarification.