Charlie Gard's dad yells, mom weeps after brain scan called 'sad'

  • Charlie Gard's dad yells, mom weeps after brain scan called 'sad'

Charlie Gard's dad yells, mom weeps after brain scan called 'sad'

The youngster suffers from a rare genetic condition and has brain damage.

Chris Gard shouted and walked out of court at the news as Ms Yates told Mr Justice Francis they not yet seen the report.

Charlie Gard's parents have been told a new scan on their critically ill son makes for "sad reading" by a lawyer acting for Great Ormond Street Hospital.

Charlie's parents, Connie Yates and Chris Gard, from Bedfont, west London, want to take the 11-month old to the USA for experimental therapy.

During the hearing, which was scheduled for Mr Justice Francis to make case directions, barrister Grant Armstrong, representing the boy's parents, told the court that the baby had undergone further scans in the past few days.

On Monday and Tuesday, Dr. Michio Hirano, a neurologist from New York's Columbia University Medical Center, met with doctors caring for Charlie and other experts and evaluated the boy in London. He said the evidence must be new and relevant to the case. These meetings were arranged after Hirano testified in a previous hearing that Charlie's MRI scan did not necessarily indicate structural damage to the brain.

In the course of the hearing, British high court Justice Francis said their son can not be moved to the United States for treatment without a court order, squashing hope that a move to grant him residency in the US would help him, according to The Independent.

Mr Gard and Ms Yates want Mr Justice Francis to rule that their 11-month-old son, who suffers from a rare genetic condition and has brain damage, should be allowed to undergo a therapy trial overseen by a specialist in NY.

Specialists at Great Ormond Street say the therapy will not help and that life support treatment should stop.

British and European courts have upheld lower court rulings that the infant's life support should be ended so that he could die with dignity.