South Korea's new president moves to soothe tensions with China

  • South Korea's new president moves to soothe tensions with China

South Korea's new president moves to soothe tensions with China

North Korea has been working to develop a nuclear-tipped missile capable of reaching the United States, presenting Trump with perhaps his most pressing security issue. This, in turn, could alarm a more conservative Washington. I will go to Beijing and I will go to Tokyo.

"A telephone conversation between Russian President Vladimir Putin and President of the Republic of Korea Moon Jae-in took place".

US officials have said they see no value in resuming worldwide talks with North Korea under current circumstances and that Pyongyang must make clear it is committed to denuclearization. "If the conditions are right, I will go to Pyongyang".

That would risk upsetting President Trump, with whom the South Korean leader spoke late on Wednesday night.

"We hope for Russian Federation to play a constructive role in order for North Korea to stop with its nuclear provocations and go the way of denuclearisation", Moon was cited as saying to Putin in the 20-minute conversation.

There's widespread opposition in South Korea to the THAAD deployment and loud protests from China, which also sees the system as a security threat.

In general, Mr. Moon has tried hard to reassure Washington.

Moon advocated a two-track approach of pressure and sanctions toward North Korea to resolve the country's nuclear issue in a comprehensive, staged way. Moon accepted the invitation at an "early date" but no specific time was set, according to a statement.

He did not elaborate, but Yoon also said the two leaders agreed that all sides must work together to ease tensions over North Korea's weapons programme. Moon took office instantly, without a transitional period.

North Korea on Thursday urged Moon's government to end what it considers confrontational policies, including joint drills with the US military.

South Korea says it needs Thaad to defend itself from North Korea, but China believes its radars threaten regional security.

Suh Hoon, a career spy agency official who was instrumental in setting up two previous summits between the North and South, was named to head the National Intelligence Service.

"President Moon said the Thaad issue can be resolved when there is no further provocation by North Korea, " Mr Yoon said.

In the first comments from the North after Mr Moon's win, the official Rodong Sinmun newspaper called on South Korea's new government to end what the paper called confrontational policies, including joint drills with the United States. Moon has called for a renegotiation of the pact.

"The cooperation between our two countries is good, but I think the potential is much higher".

That said, it is not clear that Seoul and Beijing can immediately get on the same page and put bad blood behind them.

He has certainly aroused hope in South Korea.