Lt. Gov. Brian Calley announces part-time legislature ballot proposal

  • Lt. Gov. Brian Calley announces part-time legislature ballot proposal

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley announces part-time legislature ballot proposal

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley's big announcement on Mackinac Island was widely expected to be his entry into the 2018 race for governor.

Grossmann said if you are a conservative, then you might favor this approach because in other states part-time legislatures have been associated with lower state spending overall and often leads to more Republican electoral gains. An independent political action committee has been running online ads for more than a month touting Calley and building anticipation about Tuesday's announcement. The Michigan Legislature is just one of 10 states that are full time, and according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, Michigan lawmakers make among the highest salaries in the country.

The group needs to gather 315,654 signatures from registered voters to put the issue on the ballot.

A slightly revised proposal was recently submitted to the state but has not yet been approved for circulation.

Proposals to make MI a part-time Legislature state have happened in almost every legislative session as well as several ballot proposals over the years, but none of the initiatives have gone anywhere.

But both Calley and Attorney General Bill Schuette are expected to run. An exception could be made for "extraordinary occasions".

Republican Gov. Rick Snyder can not run again due to term limits.

The idea of a part-time Legislature has its detractors.

"Corporate lobbyists already have too much power in Lansing and this proposal would only exacerbate that problem", said Lonnie Scott, executive director of Progress Michigan.

The announcement comes more than a month after Calley began appearing in a series of online advertisements highlighting his family, professional relationships and political accomplishments working under GOP Gov. Rick Snyder, who is term-limited and can not seek re-election next year.

Matt Grossmann is an associate professor of political science at Michigan State University, where he directs the Institute for Public Policy and Social Research.