EU's Tusk, Britain's May meeting for Brexit talks in London

The visit follows an outcry in Britain over Tusk last week outlining draft negotiating guidelines which say that Spain should have a veto on any trade deal agreed with Britain being extended to Gibraltar.

Nigel Farage accused the parliament of "behaving like the mafia, and treating us like a hostage", adding: "We're not, we're free to go".

But the Prime Minister was "clear" with Mr Tusk the Government will not enter discussions over the sovereignty of "The Rock", without the consent of Gibraltarians.

In a sign of the tough stance, the remaining 27 members of the European Union will take on Brexit talks; the MEPs said there can be "no trade-off between security and the future economic relationship", according to a statement.

The EPP's German leader Manfred Weber told the assembly "we want a fair and constructive atmosphere", but warned Britain can not get a better deal leaving than staying inside the bloc.

At their meeting on Thursday Ms May and Mr Tusk talked further over the draft guidelines set out after the United Kingdom triggered Article 50, which will now be cemented into a Brexit negotiating mandate for Michel Barnier at a meeting of the European Council on April 29.

In a vote yesterday (April 5) MEPs approved the resolution 516 votes in favour, 133 against, with 50 abstentions.

"He gave the floor to non-Brits to express the position of his group and I hope that Mr Farage shows the same sense of respect and honour and, perhaps, allows his Italian colleagues to speak on behalf of their group", Mr Weber said.

Brexit talks are expected to start in late May once the negotiating guidelines of the EU's 27 remaining nations have been sealed in a mandate for European Union chief negotiator Michel Barnier.

The resolution called for protecting the rights of the 3 million European citizens living in Britain, and the 1 million Britons residing in EU countries.

Barnier wants a draft deal by October 2018 so that national leaders will have time to approve it before a ratification by the European Parliament, most likely in early 2019.

Full negotiations are expected to start in late May once the negotiating guidelines of the EU's 27 remaining nations have been sealed in a mandate for the EU's chief negotiator, Michel Barnier.

The resolution noted that the European Parliament was especially concerned about the consequences of Brexit for Northern Ireland and its future relations with the Republic. When necessary, we are able to change trade routes and reorganise production chains.